Finnish Spitz Club of America

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Last Updated 07/14/2012

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The Breed:  General Information

 

Description:
The Finnish Spitz is a medium-sized, squarely built, lively dog. The beautiful red-gold color and fox-like expression are the most important features of the breed. Small erect ears and a curled tail complete the picture. In appearance the male is decidedly masculine, usually larger and carries more coat than the female who is noticeably feminine.

 

Characteristics and Training:
The Finnish Spitz has been bred for centuries as a "barking hunting dog", bringing the hunter to him with his voice. It should be noted by prospective Finnish Spitz owners that while an asset in hunting, barking could cause an unpleasant situation if one has neighbors in close proximity unless the dog is taught that unprovoked barking is not acceptable. He is more a warning dog than a guard dog and rarely bites. He has acute hearing and makes an excellent watchdog, as he is protective of his family and will advise you of any unusual happenings. The Finnish Spitz is a wonderful family dog, as well as a hunting dog. He has a special love for children and will spend countless hours romping and playing. If the kids get too rough, he will simply walk away. He is a dog with a sense of family. He is slow maturing. Although a Nordic breed, he seems little concerned about heat or cold.

This is an extremely intelligent breed which becomes very much a part of the family and is a dog which should be allowed to share with the family. However, this is not the breed for every family. Households where there is tension, harshness or loud bickering should not have a Finnish Spitz. Because of his intelligence, he is an independent and strong-willed dog and cannot be bullied. He can be trained with a firm but gentle voice and touch, and responds better to praise than correction. He is easily bored, so training sessions should be kept short and interesting. Patience is a key word when training a Finnish Spitz. You may feel as if you are making no headway and all of a sudden he will surprise you. Many Finnish Spitz do well in obedience classes if trained with a praise and reward method, as opposed to a heavy hand.

 

Care and Maintenance:
With shades of red-gold from pale honey to dark auburn, the Finnish Spitz double coatconsists of a short, soft, dense undercoat covered by long, straight, harshly textured guard hairs. The Finnish Spitz is a meticulously clean dog, sometimes giving the impression that they groom themselves. They should be brushed weekly, especially during coat change and should only be bathed when needed. The Finnish Spitz is a natural (wash and wear) dog on whom no trimming should be done, except under the pads of the feet. Trimming the whiskers or sculpturing for the show ring is to be heavily penalized. Nails should be kept trimmed, ears and teeth cleaned. With an annual trip to the Veterinarian and proper shots, the Finnish Spitz can live a lively long life. A Finnish Spitz 13 - 15 years is not unusual. This dog loves to eat and will do his best to get extra goodies. He is a dog that can easily get overweight, which will cause health problems in the long run. Feed a good quality dog food with few supplements. Treats should be limited and low in fat content. Some Finnish Spitz will enjoy a carrot or other vegetable or chew toy, all of which help reduce tartar and plaque build up on the teeth.

 

 

 

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